Monday, May 25, 2020

Oedipus Tragic Hero Analysis - 936 Words

A king must possess select components of bravery, pride, and determination that coincide with one another in a manner to which others will perceive as commendable. Nevertheless, the very qualities that make a king rise above his citizens may be the exact characteristics that lead to his downfall. This concept could be correlated to the acclaimed work of Sophocles, Oedipus Rex, whereby the epitome of a tragic hero is created in the main character, Oedipus. Moreover, Sophocles has characterized Oedipus to be the embodiment of a respectable leader, possessing both extreme pride and relentless determination, which later proves to be the fatal flaw leading to his eventual, inescapable demise. This is due to how Sophocles codified this†¦show more content†¦During the transition from the beginning to the end of his rule the hubris, or the excessive amount of pride in one’s character, expressed by Oedipus has transformed into what may be- ironically- identified as a god c omplex. The expression of admiration from Theban citizens towards Oedipus in recognition for being the king and hero of Thebes has inflated Oedipus’ self-worth to the point where it is not pride, but arrogance. â€Å"Here I am myself- you all known me, the world knows my fame: I am Oedipus.† (7-9, Oedipus Rex) While his ego escalates from the relentless devotion of his citizens Oedipus establishes a god complex of his own design, no longer caring about the gods nor fate, instead believing that destiny and the future are under his own control rather than being something predetermined.â€Å"You pray to the gods? Let me grant your prayers.† (245, Oedipus Rex) â€Å"You can’t hurt me or anyone else who sees the light- you can never touch me.† (427-8, Oedipus Rex) Oedipus even displays his authority when he refers to the chorus as his children, donning the role of a patriarch who assumes power over those he perceives as inferior or unworthy. In spite o f this, the honorable life Oedipus built for himself in Thebes shifts into one that is unrecognizable, as the truthShow MoreRelatedAn Analysis of Oedipus and Aristotles Definition of the Tragic Hero2569 Words   |  10 Pagesï » ¿An Analysis of Oedipus and Aristotles Definition of the Tragic Hero Introduction In the Poetics, Aristotle provides an outline of how the artist is to portray or represent the perfect Tragedy. A Tragedy, of course, was nothing more than a drama, in which the characters appeared better than in real life (in a comedy, they appeared worse, according to Aristotle). Aristotles Poetics makes several references to other dramatic works to illustrate his points, but he most commonly calls uponRead MoreAnalysis of Oedipus As an Aristotelian Tragic Hero in Sophocles Oedipus Rex1799 Words   |  7 Pagesï » ¿Oedipus as an Aristotelian tragic hero Although one might be inclined to express uncertainty concerning the role of Sophocles Oedipus as a tragic hero (when regarding matters from a general point of view), the character perfectly fits Aristotles definition of a tragic hero. The protagonist in Oedipus Rex is noble and can be appreciated for his greatness, considering that he embodies a series of virtuous attributes. Even with this, he is not perfect and thus makes it possible for readers toRead MoreOedipus : The King Of Thebes And Tragic Hero Essay728 Words   |  3 PagesOedipus: The King of Thebes and Tragic Hero Ancient Greek Literature encompasses an assortment of poetry and drama to include the great masterpieces of tragedy. In Classic Literature, tragedies were commonly known for their elaboration of a protagonist fitting the classification of a tragic hero. This type of a tragic hero often collectively described as a character of noble birth, facing an adversity of some nature and a fate of great suffering. The characteristics of what encompassed a tragic heroRead MoreOedipus-a Tragic Hero706 Words   |  3 PagesRunning head: Oedipus-A Tragic Hero Research Paper ENGL 102: Literature and Composition) Fall 2015 Melinda Meeds L26683811 APA Outline Thesis: In Sophocles’ â€Å"Oedipus†, Oedipus is exemplified as a tragic hero according to Aristotle’s definition because his story appeals to the reader’s humanity in the way he maintains his strengths after inadvertently causing his own downfall. I. Oedipus A. The noble birth. B. Describe Oedipus’ character. II. Tragedy A. DescribeRead MoreOedipus the King: A Greek Tragic Hero Essay516 Words   |  3 Pagesstructured analysis of the â€Å"tragic hero† of Greek drama. In his work, Poetics, he defines a tragic hero as â€Å"...The man who on the one hand is not pre-eminent in virtue and justice, and yet on the other hand does not fall into misfortune through vice or depravity, but falls because of some mistake; one among the number of the highly renowned and prosperous.† Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero is clearly shown by the main character in the Greek tragedy Oedipus the King by Sophocles. Oedipus, the protagonistRead MoreHamartia in Oedipus Rex and Death of a Salesman834 Words   |  3 PagesHamartia in Oedipus Rex and Death of a Salesman Hamartia is defined as a fatal flaw leading to the downfall of a tragic hero. Aristotle defines a tragic hero to be a man â€Å"who is not completely good and just, whose misfortune is brought out not by vice or immorality, but by some error or weakness.† The three key requirements of Aristotle in regards to a tragic hero are; a high social standing, goodness or moral excellence, or error committed by the hero in unawareness or ignorance. Two quality examplesRead MoreOedipus, A Tragic Hero1648 Words   |  7 Pages Oedipus, a Tragic Hero Bob Livingston Liberty University â€Æ' Sophocles presented the world with Oedipus around 2500 years ago. Never-the-less, the story remains among the most riveting of all time. He was, in fact, a man that was driven by a very high internal moral standard. It was that internal moral standard that ultimately entwined him in a sequence of events and circumstances that placed him in the spousal relationship with his mother. Oedipus, in fact, can truly be regarded as a tragic heroRead MoreOedipus As A Tragic Hero1724 Words   |  7 Pagesstory of Oedipus, Oedipus is considered a â€Å"Tragic Hero† because of the tragic fate and effect that he had upon his life. My definition of a tragedy is a great loss that has a unhappy ending to which concluded me to state that Oedipus falls under that category. Throughout the book, Oedipus is leading himself to his own destruction when trying to find the killer of the late King Laios. So when a journal article I found published by The John Hopkins University Press stated that a â₠¬Å"tragic hero is a manRead MoreHuman Conscience And Destiny In Oedipus The King By Sophocles1447 Words   |  6 Pageselaborate, than â€Å"Oedipus the King† by Sophocles, but there is not a single one, in which the philosophical depth and tragic strength would be combined with such incomparable sophistication, noble grace and structural perfection. The image of a monstrous Sphinx with the face of a woman, wings, sharp claws, the body of a lion and mysteriously dangerous speech penetrates the whole tragedy as an incorporation of destiny and unknown future. The following research represents a critical analysis of the Sophocles’Read MoreHamlet vs. Oedipus Essay898 Words   |  4 PagesCharacter Analysis of Prince Hamlet in Hamlet by William Shakespeare and Oedipus in Oedipus King by Sophocles In Aristotles literary discourse, Poetics, he discusses his theory of tragedy, wherein he introduces the concepts of tragic flaw or hamartia, which serves as the catalyst for the protagonists downfall or the tragedy of the story to happen. He determines a tragedy as a drama that brings about a sorrowful conclusion, arousing fear and pity in the audience (Roberts and Jacobs

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Essay about John Locke´s Flawless Government - 860 Words

As human beings we are constantly at war with each other, because we believe we are all right. This common misconception leads to a war of all against all, and creates pandemonium. As a result, we create governments to maintain control. Obviously there is no such thing as a perfect government, and there will never be a perfect government. However, there are some methods of governing that come extremely close to achieving an ideal government. John Locke offers a way of governing, which I believe comes remarkably close to creating a flawless government. John Locke constructs a government that is controlled by the will of the people, which can easily be abolished if it does not adhere to protecting their fundamental rights of the people. For†¦show more content†¦When every individual consents, they create a community/ political society, and they give up power necessary for the overall good of the society. This agreement between freemen of capable reason to unite and give up perfect freedom, judgment, and punishment in order to create a society is what John Locke believes gives way to a lawful government not just for a country but for the world. This form of government is â€Å"based upon the bond of trust between the people and their authority† (Second). Also, any breach of this bond of trust between the governed and governor would fall under the judgment of the governed. They would have the ability to replace the government with new administration, change it completely, or even create an entirely new structure of government. For John Locke a thriving government only exists if it has the consent of the people, and if it can someday be eradicated if it fails the people. John Locke’s experience with a monarchy’s brings legitimacy to his argument because he’s not basing his theory on an already existing successful government. He is instead trying to move towards a government that differs from the one he experienced, because he wants a government that respects the natural rights of men, which should be the main goal of every form of government. Personally, I assume that eighty percent of the people around me are complete morons, and if there was no government, theyShow MoreRelatedSocial Contract Theory And The Transition From State Of Nature1599 Words   |  7 PagesI’m going to discuss the Social Contract theory, and how the transition from State of Nature to government was considered a contract. Was there ever a timeframe when men lived outside of social orders and how was it? , How did men get away from that period and go into another time of social orders? Was it through power or shared understanding? Once a type of gov ernment is picked or selected, who runs it and is the privileges of the individual safeguarded? Social contract hypothesis, almost as oldRead MoreWhy The Scottish Referendum Was The Right Of The People?2346 Words   |  10 Pages Throughout history, there has been a constant cycle of colonization by large and powerful governments and the ensuing struggle for independence. From the early empires of the Greeks and Roman colonizing the Mediterranean region during the classical period, to the colonization of the Americas, Africa and Asia by England, France, Spain and Portugal, to the Soviet Union, colonization has been a theme throughout history. In some cases, those being colonized have benefitted from the protectionRead MoreThe Roman Revolution1540 Words   |  7 Pagesrally against, this led to the uprising of the Roman aristocrats against the final Etruscan King, Lucius Tarquinius. Shortly after the fall of Etruscan rule, the Roman Republic created a constitution with t he Twelve Tables at its roots. The Roman government was very strong which allowed for Rome to expand, â€Å"Polybius, who was a Greek states-man held hostage in Rome, sought to explain Rome’s ability to prosper and expand. He concluded that the Roman Constitution was largely responsible for Rome’s success†Read MoreAnalysis Of George Orwell And Animal Farm Essay2095 Words   |  9 Pagesartists, whether they be writers or painters, can lay claim to such notoriety. This paper endeavors to prove his significance in both the artistic, political, and protest world, and how he managed to integrate seemingly disparate topics together in a flawless way. As such, this paper will proceed in the following way: first, a brief literature review of some of the published work in response to Animal Farm; second, a detailed analysis of the literature in comparison and contrast to the aforementionedRead MoreThomas Heilbroner s Twenty First Century Capitalism3106 Words   |  13 Pagesmission during the thousand-year period we call feudalism† (Ibid., p. 33). And although this millennium of history is much more complex than can be described here, basically the fall of the Roman Empire left Europe â€Å"without unifying law, currency, and government, broken into a crazy quilt of isolate and self-dependent towns, manorial estates, and petty fiefdoms† (Ibid., p. 34). And it was this very fragmentation of feudal life that made it possible for the transformation into a market economy to take placeRead More`` Twenty First Century Capitalism : The Two Realms Of Capitalism3107 Words   |  13 Pagesmission during the thousand-year perio d we call feudalism† (Ibid., p. 33). And although this millennium of history is much more complex than can be described here, basically the fall of the Roman Empire left Europe â€Å"without unifying law, currency, and government, broken into a crazy quilt of isolate and self-dependent towns, manorial estates, and petty fiefdoms† (Ibid., p. 34). And it was this very fragmentation of feudal life that made it possible for the transformation into a market economy to take placeRead MoreImpact of Science on Society38421 Words   |  154 Pages Jules. 11. Asimov, Isaac, 1920. 111. United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. IV.College of William and Mary. V. Title. VI. Series. Q175.55.B88 1985 303.4’83 84-1 4 1 59 For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 Foreword Science and technology have had a major impact on society, and their impact is growing. By drastically changing our means of communication, the way we work, our housing, clothes, and food, ourRead MoreImpact of Science on Society38427 Words   |  154 PagesBergman, Jules. 11. Asimov, Isaac, 1920. 111. United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. IV.College of William and Mary. V. Title. VI. Series. Q175.55.B88 1985 303.4’83 84-1 4 1 59 For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 Foreword Science and technology have had a major impact on society, and their impact is growing. By drastically changing our means of communication, the way we work, our housing, clothes, and food, our methodsRead MoreProject Managment Case Studies214937 Words   |  860 PagesEDITION - PROJECT MANAGEMENT CASE STUDIES, SECOND EDITION HAROLD KERZNER, Ph.D. Division of Business Administration Baldwin-Wallace College Berea, Ohio John Wiley Sons, Inc. This book is printed on acid-free paper. @ Copyright O 2006 by John Wiley Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Published by John Wiley Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey Published simultaneously in Canada No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in anyRead MoreDeveloping Management Skills404131 Words   |  1617 Pagesbuilt-in pretests and posttests, focus on what you need to learn and to review in order to succeed. Visit www.mymanagementlab.com to learn more. DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT SKILLS EIGHTH EDITION David A. Whetten BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY Kim S. Cameron UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Prentice Hall Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam Cape Town Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montreal Toronto Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Does Antidepressants Use in Teenagers Increase Suicide Rates

Introduction Teen depression is a serious condition that can be a devastating problem for both the child and parent. It is a disorder that reduces their moods thus causing loss of interest in things they should enjoy and make them irritable. In this literature review we are going to examine the use of antidepressants to treat teen depression. It will also look at the risks of suicides increased as a result of taking antidepressants and the measures taken to reduce this problem. Can antidepressants use in Teenagers increase suicide rates/thoughts? In the past few recent years, there has been a developing concern about the use of antidepressants in teenagers (13-20 years of age) as there has been increase in teen depression in the†¦show more content†¦Are antidepressants safe for teenagers? Depression is a treatable condition by the use of psychotherapy or counseling, drug therapy, and other measures can alleviate symptoms and help teenagers to succeed in school, develop and maintain healthy relationships and feel more self-confident. However depression in teenagers can be a very devastating problem for both the child and the parent. In most cases they both want to get back to the â€Å"normal† life that the teen had lead before. In many instances, the parents want to have the child on antidepressant in that it helps to reestablish the normal balance of chemicals in the brain. There are various classes of antidepressants used to treat depression in teenagers they include: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or other atypical antidepressants and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (Goodyer et al., 2007) In healthcare set up if a teenager with depression is prescribed an antidepressant the benefits and possible risks and side effects, instructions for the dose and timing, potential interactions with other prescriptions or non-prescriptions medication and alternatives to medication for example continued therapy. These medications for depression in teenagers are recommended but due to the numerous side effects associated with these drugs which is not safe for the teenagers and the availability of effective alternatives (SSRIs), TCA are lessShow MoreRelatedTeen Suicide Essay examples1443 Words   |  6 PagesSuicides are one of the leading causes of teen deaths in today’s society. The thought of one ending his or her life is developing in the minds of teenagers around the globe. â€Å"To kill oneself as a means of escape from poverty or disappointed love, or bodily or mental anguish, is the deed of coward rather than a brave man, because to run away from trouble is a form of co wardice. While it is true that the suicide braves death, he does it not for some noble object but to escape some ill† (Marcovitz 17)Read MoreEffects Of Depression And Its Effects On Young People2089 Words   |  9 PagesEvery 100 minutes a teenager commits suicide (Dave Pallone paragraph 1). Untreated depression is the number one cause of suicides in people under the age of 18. This isn’t the only effect of depression, but it is one of the many ongoing struggles teens face when battling this disorder. Between five hundred thousand to one million adolescents attempt suicide each year but thankfully, only a small amount of those attempts are successful. Teenage depression is a serious mental health issue thatRead MoreThe Effects Of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors3601 Words   |  15 Pagesfatigue, these are all symptoms of being a teenager, or perhaps an indication of a greater issue; childhood depression (Kazdin, 2006). Childhood depression has estimates of a 1-year prevalence as high as 2.5% in children and 8.3% in adolescence (Valnuck, Libby, Sills, Giese, Allen, 2004). This is a tragic suffering experienced by many youths, but in 1987 there was the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s). At first glance, antidepressants may seem to be the answer to a parentRead MoreHypothesis Teen Suicide875 Words   |  4 PagesOver a time span of one year, 2003 to 2004, suicide amongst children, especially teens has risen drastically. Contemplating suicide at any age is horrible. When a teenage, who has the ability to make informed decisions and has all the potential in the world, considers commit ting suicide, this is a tragedy. The tragedy suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people ages 15-24. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. This paper attempts to list theoriesRead MoreManagement of Bipolar Disorder in Adults and Diagnosis in Adolescent Children726 Words   |  3 Pageseffective when properly diagnosed, but there is a risk of suicide while undergoing therapy. Treatments for bipolar disorder our on the market but they can only treat the mania or the depression, which is why the patient needs to be under supervision. When a person does not follow the prescribed course of treatment the risk of suicide increases. Another problem with bipolar disorder is that it can be misdiagnosed in teenagers in going though puberty. There are two formsRead MoreSetting Up Sucide Prevention Programs1427 Words   |  6 Pagesbullying and sex education programs, but suicide, the third leading cause of adolescent deaths (Caine 1), is practically ignored. Many schools only offer hot lines for suicidal students. While some schools have implemented suicide prevention programs and the government has recognized teenage suicide as a growing problem, effective solutions need to be discovered and funded to prevent these catastrophic deaths. The U.S. federal government should develop and fund suicide prevention programs in high schoolsRead MoreColumbine High School Massacre : Self Control Theory Essay1709 Words   |  7 Pageswere both seniors. Collaboratively they murdered 12 students and 1 teacher. Aside from the kills they injured 21 other people, and an additional 3 more while trying to escape the horrendous event. After their killing rampage, the murderers committed suicide. The exact reason of why the committed this crime to this day is unclear. The personal journals of the two perpetrators referenced that they wanted the event to compete with those of the Oklahoma City bombing and other deadly events that happenedRead MoreWhat Causes Depression And Can It Be Prevented?1281 Words   |  6 Pagesthe high rate of depression-related suicide among teenagers. WHAT CAUSES DEPRESSION AND CAN IT BE PREVENTED? It s not known exactly what causes depression. As with many mental disorders, a variety of factors may be involved (Mayo). Depression often begins in the teens, 20s or 30s, but it can happen at any age. More women are diagnosed with depression more than men, but this may be due in part because women are more likely to seek treatment. There are a number of factors that may increase the chanceRead MoreSchool Shootings - Failures of Welfare Society Essay2034 Words   |  9 Pages Schools are no longer a safer environment for teenagers and children in today’s society. Every year, many young lives are taken away due to school shootings. School shootings are widespread issue that seek attention because of their dramatic and frighten nature. These shootings results teenagers who have been harassed or bullied into depression come back with the guns to get revenge. However, School shootings are becoming more and more of an everyday incident around the world. School shootingRead MoreSuicide Through The Lifespan Of Suicide2332 Words   |  10 PagesOverview The overview of suicide through the lifespan. Suicide is the second leading cause of death in Canada (Suicide Facts at a Glance, n.d.). In cases of suicide among the elderly, there are many social, psychological, and emotional pressures at play. Two of the most frequent causes of death among the elderly are a sense of social isolation and the loss of independence that comes with aging, often in the form of chronic illness or mental incapacitation. The paper is to investigate the research

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Innovation and Modern Management Technology - Myassignmenthelp.Com

Question: Discuss about the Innovation and Modern Management Technology. Answer: Introduction Innovation and technology are one of the key aspects of gaining competitive advantage in the modern business industry. The recent global trends show that the developing countries are growing at a rapid rate and this has been possible due to the use of technology and innovation. Technology is one of the essential components of globalization and the developing countries are competing at equal level with global giants because they are able to gain competitive advantage due to innovation and technological prowess. This is very evident from the economic growth, gross domestic product and per capita income (Johnston and Marshall 2016). The new economies have taken a front seat in the global market by using creation, acquisition, dissemination, adaptation and knowledge use. Therefore, the organizations in developing economies have been able to adapt to the global context by using the restructuring their business and exploiting the available market opportunities by changing the global contex t (Jarle Gressgrd et al. 2014). The emerging giants are competing in various countries with established global giants. Several countries with time have opened up to foreign competition and it has altered the challenges faced by the companies. Thus, survival in such a market was tough but provided the local organizations with opportunities that were very lucrative (Camgni 2017). This review would be looking into four articles to find out about the different views of authors regarding this extensive topic of innovation and technology, and the way the organisations have been able to use it for overcoming hurdles and enabling them to challenge organisations that has been in business for long. Literature Review and Critical Evaluation The organizations that survived and had been able to capitalize on that opportunity have become among the top competitors in the market. Mahindra Mahindra won car of the year in SUV category when they launched Scorpio in the market and were the best sellers globally leaving behind the major players in the market. This was the advent of a new era which completely transformed the global market scenario and the present market scenario is the evidence that will prove it. Technology has been a major contributor in this aspect as technological superiority, research and developed is essential for competing with the bigger players in the market. As stated by, Kvochko (2013), information communication technology is the fastest growing industry which has created jobs for the populations in emerging countries. On the other hand, information communication technology is important for development and innovation of the businesses. There has been a rapid growth in using online media so leveraging n ew technology is very important for maintaining the competitiveness in the industry. The author has mentioned few impacts of technology on a growing economy, first is creation of jobs, second is advent of new industries and services, third is the growth in GDP, fourth is innovation in business and fifth is workforce transformation. Infosys, a multinational organization, is providing consulting, outsourcing and information technology services to the various clients. The emergence of information technology in a developing country like India has increased the GDP from 1.2 to 7.5 in a decade which shows that how positively the technological market can impact the economy of a developing country. The unemployment rate has decreased significantly which has in turn improved the disposable income and lifestyle of majority of the population. Studies have found that globally, innovation centres are a rise, as more and more established corporations are looking for a more proactive approach to bring in competitiveness and build complete strategic defence and offense as an answer to digital disruption, says Solis, Buvat and Khadikar (2016). Organisations have prepared themselves to be transitioning to the subsequent levels of their innovative empire building. Limited experimentation days are over and the organisations are looking out in the world for building genuine partnerships and turning inventive ideas into substantial results. It has become a situation of innovating largely or face the risk of falling far behind. Since, the founding of Henry Fords assembly line innovations, Ford has moved forward towards another fundamental revolution: changing from automobile to mobility services. The transformation has been driven by the organisations innovation centre at Silicon Valley. The centre swiftly became the audition platfor m for technological start-ups which are looking for displaying the way interface technologies have the capability of enhancing the experience for the customers of Ford. This innovation centre has employees who are concentrating on providing innovative solutions in the domain of mobility, automotive vehicles, connectivity, big data and customer experience. The capability that has arisen from these innovation centres help building successful relationships that have a wider spectrum of technology start-ups. Silicon Valley has continued their stance of being the centre of the worlds most dominating innovation empire a thriving location which is an innovative ecosystem having a cluster of innovation centres. The author has found out that Singapore has become the Fintech hub of Asia. On the other hand, India has fast risen to be the country hosting the maximum innovation centres. Bangalore in India is the Silicon Valley of the country. Australia is the latest entry in the list, with loca l companies setting up innovation centres. The authors previously found that the manufacturing companies have become aggressive in setting up innovation centres. In this research they have found that even financial companies have joined the bandwagon, competing against Fintech start-ups. Their research even found out that the dominant model for innovation centre rest in the accelerators. Organisations have started moving from experimentation towards a more structured model looking for large investments, management and engagement. Companies are now looking to get associated with latest trends. In this context, Big Data has stepped back, giving way to Internet of Things, Fintech and Digital Healthcare (Solis, Buvat and Khadikar 2016). As stated by Jaruzelski (2017), the recent trends in the market shows the global hub of research and development are shifting from developed countries to developing countries such as India and China. It has been common practise where organization spent on research and development in foreign nations. However, there is relative decrease in corporate innovation in Europe and United states has been benefited from. However, after Donald Trump came in to the picture, there has been strictness in immigration and the foreign students are preferring to study in universities in Canada. Thus, this will lead to a decrease in talent acquisition in the country and the similar thing is happening United Kingdom due to it exit from the European Union. Thus, the companies will conduct their research and development in countries where there is hub of talents and is a fast-growing economy. Thus, the growing developing economies come in to the picture and the hub of global research and development are sh ifting at a rapid rate. India and China have become the global hub of research and development, this trend will keep on shifting because the organizations like to spend in economies that are rapidly growing. Rolls- Royce, Ericsson, Bosch, Coolpad, Foxconn, Michelin, LeEco and Delta are few of the companies that have made huge research and development in growing nations like India. India and China have been dominating the global superpowers like United States in this respect and have sealed more than 57 ERD projects form the foreign investors. This because of the talent hub of both the countries and the market economy which is quite stable for the organization. Moreover, these engineering technologies are available in these countries at a cheaper price which is even more lucrative for the global companies. Moreover, the growth in economy has increased the disposable income of majority of the population so these organizations are getting better response from the companies in the market. According to Germany and Muralidharan (2001), the concept of value capture is already known to all the major companies in the global market. However, the companies are more focused on creating value rather than on capturing value. Thus, the organizations are more focused on generating revenue than on gaining profits. Thus, fine tuning of the business model will be an appropriate and continuously improving the lacking in their value chain will be the factor for increasing the profit margin. The concept is flawed where the organizations think of spending more on investments in order to generate more amount of revenue from the market. Thus, finding the key choke points will be the necessary for improving the profit margin for various organizations. Value capture consist of three important phases and they are proving value and feasibility of innovation, defining the game rules and maximization of value. In this context Amazon is an organization which has changed the thought process of all its competitors. Amazon has been able to create and capture value for it consumers which has made them the market leader. There has been immense transformation in the organization as the organization uses innovation to continuously make improvements to the overall processes. Thus, the gap within the supply chain and the overall business model is improved to capture value. It can be understood that by decreasing the overall cost structure Amazon has been able to capture value and increase their profit margin by keeping the investment constant. Conclusion Innovation and technology have become one of the key aspects of gaining competitive advantage in the modern business industry. The recent global trends show that the developing countries are growing at a rapid rate and this has been possible due to the use of technology and innovation. Technology is one of the essential components of globalization and the developing countries are competing at equal level with global giants because they are able to gain competitive advantage due to innovation and technological prowess. This review has looked into four articles to find out about the different views of authors regarding this extensive topic of innovation and technology, and the way the organisations have been able to use it for overcoming hurdles and enabling them to challenge organisations that has been in business for long. From the review it has been understood that globally innovation has been adopted by a lot of organisations, making it the most important element in their business processes. Different organisations have adopted innovation in different ways, either by changing their business model, or their approach to customers and competitors, improvement in work procedures, or something in the similar line. With the help of research and development, organisations and countries are growing, and more organisations are spending on economies that have showed signs of development. The idea is capturing as much value as possible from the market. References Camagni, R., 2017. Technological change, uncertainty and innovation networks: towards a dynamic theory of economic space. InSeminal Studies in Regional and Urban Economics(pp. 65-92). Springer, Cham. Germany, R. and Muralidharan, R., 2001. The three phases of value capture: finding competitive advantage in the information age.Strategy And Business, pp.82-93. Jarle Gressgrd, L., Amundsen, O., Merethe Aasen, T. and Hansen, K., 2014. Use of information and communication technology to support employee-driven innovation in organizations: a knowledge management perspective.Journal of Knowledge Management,18(4), pp.633-650. Jaruzelski, B., 2017.Economic Nationalism and the Future of Global RD. [online] strategy+business. Available at: https://www.strategy-business.com/blog/Economic-Nationalism-and-the-Future-of-Global-RD?gko=b22a3 [Accessed 15 Dec. 2017]. Johnston, M.W. and Marshall, G.W., 2016.Sales force management: Leadership, innovation, technology. Routledge. Kvochko, E., 2013, April. Five ways technology can help the economy. InWorld Economic Forum. Solis, B., Buvat, J. and Khadikar, A., 2016.Digital Dynasties: The Rise of Innovation Empires Worldwide. [online] Capgemini.com. Available at: https://www.capgemini.com/consulting/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2017/07/the_rise_of_innovation_empires.pdf [Accessed 15 Dec. 2017]. Andriole, S.J., 2011.It's All about the People: Technology Management that Overcomes Disaffected People, Stupid Processes, and Deranged Corporate Cultures. CRC Press. Cetindamar, D., Phaal, R. and Probert, D., 2016.Technology management: activities and tools. Palgrave Macmillan. Christensen, C.M., Burgelman, R.A. and Wheelwright, S.C., 2008. Strategic management of technology and innovation.McGraw-Hill/Irwin, Columbus, OH. Goffin, K. and Mitchell, R., 2016.Innovation Management: Effective Strategy and Implementation. Palgrave Macmillan. Owen, R., Bessant, J. and Heintz, M. eds., 2013.Responsible innovation: managing the responsible emergence of science and innovation in society. John Wiley Sons. Roper, A.T., Cunningham, S.W., Porter, A.L., Mason, T.W., Rossini, F.A. and Banks, J., 2011. Forecasting and management of technology, John Wiley.New York, NY. Tidd, J., Bessant, J. and Pavitt, K., 2005.Managing innovation integrating technological, market and organizational change. John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

Friday, April 10, 2020

Oral Arguments and Decision

Introduction Oral arguments and briefs have a great influence on jurists’ decisions in the courts. In his book, Oral Arguments and Decision Making on the United States Supreme Court, Timothy Johnson notes that judges consider a number of issues such as oral arguments, political considerations, and external factors, which are not part of the case records prior to making an ultimate decision in a particular case. Conventionally, jurists do not decide on how to decree on a particular case before listening to it.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Oral Arguments and Decision-making on the Supreme Court specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More The intent of this paper is to affirm that oral arguments affect how judges make decisions in courts and in this particular instance, in the Supreme Court. The paper begins by a summary of a reading Timothy Johnson’s book, Oral Arguments and Decision Making on the United Stat es Supreme Court. Summary of the oral arguments and decision-making on the US Supreme Court Johnson argues that advocates should not use oral argument as a tool for influencing judges, but rather for accomplishing the goals that the judges have set. He further asserts that conscious of the existing external factors that might influence the process of decision-making and the need for creating strong internal coalitions, judges capitalize on the arguments to get facts, form legal, and procedure matters for conference deliberation, and finally use them to develop their written judgments (Johnson 28). Johnson presents a properly researched writing that helps students comprehend how strategic decision-making is achieved in the Supreme Court. Johnson notes that litigation involves the presentation of legal problems in two opposing sides with the exemption of the amicus briefs, with the two opposing sides presenting their arguments on biased grounds (26). Conscious of the bias-based argume nts, judges utilize oral argument as a tool for determining issues, which are of greatest importance irrespective of whether they were tabled by advocates. How oral arguments affect decision-making in the Supreme Court In his book, Johnson refers to a number of cases tackled in the 1970-80s and uses them to compare the briefs presented by the parties and the questions that developed during the oral argument session. The aim of the latter is to determine if the court simply requests the parties to explicate the issues that they wrote in their briefs or they go past the issues outlined in the briefs and seek clarification on new developments. According to Johnson, most issues raised by judges, close to 80%, are new concerns that were not tackled by the parties and amicus (98). Furthermore, in instances where the jurists raise issues in relation to the briefs, they mainly seek to understand how particular issues in the briefs affect public policy. In essence, judges are concerned with how the litigants’ briefs influence external factors, for instance as the Congress to help them determine policy options that should adopt in coming to a particular conclusion.Advertising Looking for essay on law? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Indeed, oral argument plays a critical, but distinct role for advocates and judges. When an advocate presents his or her oral argument, he or she is able to clarify facts related to the cases that helps the judges when examining what the case actually entails (Johnson 47). By simply tabling the briefs, they are never assured if the court heard their plea, as they are not certain if the judges read the briefs. Even the responses from the judges do not erase the doubts as the judges’ legal clerks normally prepare the responses. Oral argument is an important communication aspect to the court as it assures the litigants that they have communicated and the genuine people have heard their cases. It affirms the significance of face-to-face communication. The nature of communication adopted by a lawyer during the oral submission is of great essence. Moreover, oral arguments help judges to get the main points because lawyers have to be precise. It compels advocates to concentrate on issues, which they consider as important. Since lawyers often have a fixed time, possibly one or two hours, to present their oral argument, the litigant is thus compelled to highlight the important issues. This use of language is absent in briefs where lawyers have the liberty to respond to the laws and facts that they find relevant for their case. Moreover, lawyers will be in search of fresh perspectives in relation to the case. As a result, jurists are able to seek clarification on some of the questions that emerged from the briefs. Unlike briefs, justices are in a position to know the highlights of the case as they can easily question the litigant to explain to the court what he or she considers as collateral issues, which should be put into consideration during their judgment. Subsequently, if an advocate fails to clarify some of the issues he or she raised in the brief, then he or she cannot blame the court if it makes a little drift from the issues when making its judgment. In essence, the oral argument has the power to shape the outcome the judges intend to make. The justices can use it to get backing for their verdicts and ultimate results. Johnson notes that most issues that justices raise during an oral argument presentation often appear in their written opinions (73). For instance, in the case of Roe v Wade, a question that emerged during the oral argument later developed to a Court’s theory (Johnson 75). In essence, oral arguments give judges an instrument for substantiating the reasons why they particular decisions. The communication amongst judges is also a vibrant occurrence during oral arguments. This aspect helps judges in raising ma tters that probably a litigant had shied from presenting. Furthermore, raising such questions helps judges to tackle some issues that would complicate the decision-making process if not handled early enough and in the open.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Oral Arguments and Decision-making on the Supreme Court specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Indeed, the time that justices get to have a collegial deliberation in the Supreme Court is normally inadequate, and thus they may utilize a portion of the oral argument session to consult each other on the possible outcome of a case (Johnson 94). Nonetheless, the major role of oral argument is to endow justices with adequate and pertinent information. Justices are coupled with reservations that can only be altered by relevant information and laws. From this approach, litigants present oral arguments to give justices information that can shape how they decide on their clien t’s case. In essence, the aim of advocates is to table issues and link them to the current law coupled with how they are going to affect the public policies. Judges rely on the oral submissions made by lawyers to assist them in advancing their goals. A skilled oral advocate can largely influence the outcome of a given case. For instance, in the case of Jensen v Quaring (1985), Justice Blackmun confessed that the oral arguments made by the respondents simplified his decision-making process. Considering the aforementioned issues, what type of information that justices seek after that eventually influences their position in a particular case? At times, justices simply need to have a clear-cut understanding of the issues presented by litigants. Jurists raise questions on certain issues not only to get facts, but also to determine the type of approach that they should adopt. Lawyers are thus compelled to think beyond the facts and law applicable in a certain case and they are advi sed to incorporate the social and political effects of the case in their arguments because judges will consider social and political impact of their ruling with respect to the case. Judges try to associate every point raised by advocates to other scenarios in a bid to construct the actual outcome of the arguments. Essentially, they want advocates to guide them towards a particular path. Nevertheless, judges do not communicate their strategies directly to litigants. One can tell approach adopted by the courts by examining the questions that justices raise during oral arguments. Recent studies indicate that one can simply predict the outcome of a case by tallying the amount of questions directed to a given party. Apparently, a lawyer that receives a certain question ends up losing his or her case (Johnson, 91). Moreover, the prevailing tone during the oral argument can affect the ultimate decision made by judges. The tone gives a glimpse of the speaker’s ambitions, intentions, and aspirations. Presumably, when judges adopt a harsh tone towards a given lawyer, then he or she is likely to lose the case Jonathan, (28).Advertising Looking for essay on law? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Johnson comes up with a number of models that Supreme Court judges apply when making decisions with respect to oral arguments. Judges are affected by the quality of information presented by a litigant. In that, judges are likely to vote for the attorney who offers the best oral argument. In this regard, it can be noted that judges may be influenced by a lawyers experience and skills in oral arguments. For instance, judges are likely to be convinced by a Solicitor General that an advocate who has a one year in experience. Another argument is that policy preference plays a role in how judges make decisions after an oral argument. In that, judges are likely to support attorneys whose presentations are close to their policy preferences. Nonetheless, the law restricts how judges are influenced by their ideological beliefs. To explain the latter, Johnson (94) develops the conditional effect of oral advocacy theory where he argues that the proximity of the ideological position of judge in comparison to an attorney is likely to be influenced by the credibility of an attorney’s oral argument. Moreover, the oral argument plays a substantial role in complex cases. Using the conditional effect of information need theory, Johnson (102) asserts that the influence of oral arguments on judges in dependant on the complexity of a particular case. Conclusion The importance and impact of oral argument on the Supreme Court‘s decisions can never be ignored. Not every case is decided on oral arguments; however, when justices begin requesting advocates to expound certain issues during oral arguments, then its significance cannot be overlooked. Oral arguments influence all parties in the Supreme Court and the eventual decision made by judges. By focusing on the important issues, it aids judges in deciding on the strategy that they will adopt in their judgment. On the other hand, justices ask the lingering questions that might have developed from the briefs and get clarifi cation on the important issues of the case. Moreover, it gives judges an opportunity to have collegial consultations on issues that would have possibly made it difficult to determine a case. The impact of oral argument on the Supreme Court cases can thus never be underrated, as it influences the decisions made by judges despite the presence of briefs. Works Cited Johnson, Timothy. Oral arguments and decision-making on the United States  Supreme Court, New York: State University of New York Press, 2011. Print. This essay on Oral Arguments and Decision-making on the Supreme Court was written and submitted by user MotherAskani to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Gothic Architecture

Gothic architecture first got its name during the Italian renaissance when the people considered all buildings of the Middle Ages barbaric and associated them with the savage Goths. With the passing of many centuries, Gothic became more clearly associated with the closing era of the medieval age. In time, the separation point would set around the style, which followed, the Romanesque era. The title was later limited to the hardly barbaric architecture of the period between Romanesque and Renaissance. Gothic architecture emerged from Romanesque architecture in the year 1144 AD. A Benedictine abbot called Suger was building a new church outside of Paris. He decided that he wanted something new and impressive. Suger wanted to make the Abby church of St. Denis so tall that it would seem to reach the heavens, and so amazing that everyone would remember it. When people saw this new form of architecture, they were amazed. The Gothic style quickly spread. Towns and cities would not let their churches be outdone by churches elsewhere. They tried to build taller, longer, and more stunning churches than any other. All buildings reflect the society, which produced them, and cannot be understood without some knowledge of that society. The social and political conditions of the Middle Ages had very little comfort or luxury in the domestic living except in the feudal fortress castled of the nobles. The primacy of commerce in towns of this period is best seen in their market place. The church or castle gate had ceased to be a major influence on town planning. Everywhere towns grew outwards from their market squares, from a road junction, or from a swelling in the street. Medieval peasant houses of this early date have left few remains. Their date has left few obivious remains. Their study has been exclusively archaeological. Yet there is plenty evidence, at least among those who had land. Stone in the villages-as in castle, church and town- foun... Free Essays on Gothic Architecture Free Essays on Gothic Architecture Gothic architecture first got its name during the Italian renaissance when the people considered all buildings of the Middle Ages barbaric and associated them with the savage Goths. With the passing of many centuries, Gothic became more clearly associated with the closing era of the medieval age. In time, the separation point would set around the style, which followed, the Romanesque era. The title was later limited to the hardly barbaric architecture of the period between Romanesque and Renaissance. Gothic architecture emerged from Romanesque architecture in the year 1144 AD. A Benedictine abbot called Suger was building a new church outside of Paris. He decided that he wanted something new and impressive. Suger wanted to make the Abby church of St. Denis so tall that it would seem to reach the heavens, and so amazing that everyone would remember it. When people saw this new form of architecture, they were amazed. The Gothic style quickly spread. Towns and cities would not let their churches be outdone by churches elsewhere. They tried to build taller, longer, and more stunning churches than any other. All buildings reflect the society, which produced them, and cannot be understood without some knowledge of that society. The social and political conditions of the Middle Ages had very little comfort or luxury in the domestic living except in the feudal fortress castled of the nobles. The primacy of commerce in towns of this period is best seen in their market place. The church or castle gate had ceased to be a major influence on town planning. Everywhere towns grew outwards from their market squares, from a road junction, or from a swelling in the street. Medieval peasant houses of this early date have left few remains. Their date has left few obivious remains. Their study has been exclusively archaeological. Yet there is plenty evidence, at least among those who had land. Stone in the villages-as in castle, church and town- foun...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

The influence of technology on modernist and avant-garde architecture Essay

The influence of technology on modernist and avant-garde architecture - Essay Example After the liberal-national revolutions of 1848, there was the need to expand the economy of the colonial territories and to fill the political, military and economic conditions with the traditional European. This led to the development of cities in its suburbs. In addition, the decrease in mortality because of the improved standards of living in terms of nutrition and medical techniques in urban areas resulted in urbanisation. The increase in population in urban areas led to transformation of old neighbourhoods into slums as well as entry of jerry-built houses that would provide shelter to people working in the factories. However, the Housing of the Working Classes Act of 1890 and the slum clearance Acts of 1868 and 1875 were established to provide quality housing. As the construction of new houses for workers began, several architectural designs developed in order to produce engaging and beautiful buildings and improve the overall appearance of the urban centres. According to Conrad s (25), in organic architecture, the building, its furnishings and its setting and environment are considered as one thing. Furnishings such as tables, chairs, musical instruments and cabinets are said to be part of the buildings, as well. However, the heating, lighting or ventilation can be incorporated together with other features in the building or excluded. Conrads (25) argues that a human dwelling place should be a complete work of art that is closely related to modern life and fit for people to live. It should include harmonious entity, which is beautiful and suitable in providing the needs of the dwellers. An example of such a building is shown below. Winslow House in Chicago (1893) Conrads (95) states it is through the new evolving techniques that people are able to discover new materials and new ways to construct objects; hence, enabling individuals to learn how to design objects and develop a new attitude towards design. This includes the living environment of vehicles and machines, limitation of certain characteristics such as colours and they should be readily accessible to all. Additionally, they should be economical in terms of space used, time, materials and money. This can be seen in Gropius office (1932) as shown below. Bauhaus argues that the necessities of life are the same for most people. Additionally, he states that the home and its furnishings are mass consumer goods and their design is as a result of reason other than a matter of passion. Machines that produce such products use steam and electricity in order to help people from working manually when producing their daily needs as well as to provide them with cheap products that are better than those produced by hand. According to Conrads (96), Bauhaus workshops are laboratories that are suitable for production of mass products, which are well developed and can be improved with time. An illustration of Bauhaus workshop is as shown below. According to Conrads (96), the Bauhaus represents that the contrast between the industry and the crafts is less marked by the difference in tools used than by the division of labor in the industry, as well as the quality of the work in the crafts. The past crafts have changed, and new ones are expected to emerge in a new and productive industry in which they will carry out work for industrial production. The experiments in the laboratory workshops will produce models and prototypes that will be implemented in the factories to produce quality work. Moreover, the products that have been produced in the Bauhaus are also been produced in other firms with are closely related to Bauhaus. Some of the architectural features that describe a new building according to Le Corbusier houses designs include the supports, the roof gardens, the free designing of the plan, the free design of the facade and the horizontal window. For the supports, it is necessary to distinguish between the non-supporting and the supporting elements,